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Digital Nomads Are Flocking To This Surprising Colombian City For Renewable Visa

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Presented with the golden opportunity to work from just about anywhere in the world, millions of digital nomads are flocking to Colombia, which, given the low cost of living, fascinating culture, and welcoming locals, isn’t all that surprising.

What most of us didn’t expect, though, was the fact that one once-underrated city quickly emerged as the country’s most coveted destination among remote workers, and its meteoric rise in popularity doesn’t seem to be slowing down anytime soon.

View of Medellin, Colombia

Medellin, otherwise known as the “City of Eternal Spring,” obviously has a lot to offer – paradisic weather is just one of them – but why can't digital nomads seem to get enough of it, and is it really as good as it seems? 

One Of The Easiest Digital Nomads To Obtain

Remember how I said that digital nomads have the opportunity to work from just about anywhere on Earth?

While that’s technically true, in reality, moving someplace foreign is usually much more complex than that.

Woman doing paperwork

Most hurdles that come with relocating have something to do with obtaining the much-talked-about digital nomad visa, and lucky for those eager to explore South America right now, Colombia’s is one of the easiest (and cheapest) to get.

This visa, introduced almost two years ago, only requires applicants to show proof of earning $684/month for the past three months.

Other than that, all you need to be considered is a recommendation letter from your employer (or your own motivational letter if you’re self-employed), valid health insurance, and a humble $52 application fee – that’s literally it!

US Dollar bills

There’s A Real Possibility That You Can Stay Here As Long As You Want

OK, so you submitted your application, now what? 

You’ll wait for the reply stating whether you’re approved, and if so, how long you get to stay in Colombia without having to take any further action – most applicants who meet the above criteria are granted a 1-year visa (with the longest possible duration being two years).

Colombian stamp on a passport

If that’s the case for you and a year doesn’t seem like enough, don’t worry.

As of right now, Colombian law states that digital nomad visas can be renewed an indefinite amount of times so long as the applicant still meets the set criteria.

So, assuming you’re making more than $684 a month, are equipped with health insurance, and nothing goes terribly wrong during your stay in the country or the application process, you can stay there as long as you’d like.

Visa application

This can provide some much-needed stability in the lives of digital nomads tired of having to move every year or two thanks to the far stricter rules imposed by other countries, so if that sounds like what you need right now, I highly recommend giving Colombia a chance.

There’s An Incredible Community Of Digital Nomads In The City

It’s no secret that being a digital nomad comes with a wide array of perks – why else would so many people chase it as the ultimate lifestyle?

One of its biggest downsides, though, is that it can be pretty isolating.

Woman walking alone at night

You move somewhere new every year or so, which makes it near-impossible to form any meaningful connections or foster a sense of community – luckily for those moving to Medellin, however, the city is a thriving hub of digital nomads that’ll make you feel right at home.

Over 8,300 digital nomads come to Medellin every single month – this translates to 99,600 people flocking to the city in a year, which, to put things into perspective, is more than what Buenos Aires, a city with twice the size and six times the population, welcomed in 2023.

Rest assured, you’ll get to interact with an incredible network of like-minded people just about anywhere you go, which is just another reason why remote workers are favoring Medellin over its far, far better-known counterparts.

Medellin at night

Potential Downsides To Consider Before You Pack Up Your Bags

Chances are that, by now, you’re probably Googling flights to Medellin and packing your bags – I know I would be after reading all that’s said above.

However, moving to the Colombian hub as a digital nomad isn’t all rainbows and butterflies, and there are a couple of things you need to know before ultimately making a decision.

Homeless man in Medellin, Colombia

For starters, there are some very real safety issues concerning foreigners coming to Medellin.

The article linked above is an extremely detailed guide of everything safety-related travelers need to know before coming to the city, so I highly recommend you read it, but in a nutshell, while violent crime isn’t particularly a major concern in Medellin, armed robberies, druggings, and petty crimes against tourists are still occurring as of 2024.

Secondly, this insane surge in remote workers coming to the city has led to a rapid increase in rent prices, which are currently starting to reach Branson (MO) – levels.

Panoramic View Of Medellin, Colombia, Latin America

While not too expensive, these are prices you wouldn’t expect from a country you’re probably moving to cut back on living expenses (think $800-$1300 for a one-bedroom apartment in a central location).

At the end of the day, moving to Medellin, just like anything else, will require a cost-benefit analysis on your part – what are you willing to sacrifice to get to experience Medellin’s fantastic weather, stunning attractions, and convenient renewable visa?

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Opinions expressed here are the author’s alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, hotel, airline, or other entity. This content has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of the entities included within the post.