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These Are The 5 Cheapest Cities In Europe For Digital Nomads According To New Report

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The digital nomad lifestyle has never been more appealing than it is right now.

While years of forced remote work may have been the catalyst to record numbers of people working remotely and embracing digital nomadism, the trend of trading in the office for a laptop has not shown any signs of slowing.

And while the allure of more travel and freedom is certainly a major draw of the lifestyle, the reality is more and more people choose nomadism to find relief from inflation.

Plovdiv, Bulgaria aerial view of city with mountains in the background

If you’re anything like me, the cripplingly high cost of living in America has you fantasizing about relocating to a more affordable country.

Choosing a city to base yourself is no small task, and a low cost of living is the top priority for many digital nomads.

Luckily, BrotherUK just released a new index studying the best and worst places in Europe to be a digital nomad. 

The study prioritized key factors like cost of living, political stability, and overall happiness of people who live in these places.

If you’re in the market for a temporary home base that is rich in culture and low in cost, read on to discover the five cheapest European cities for remote workers.

Oradea Romania old buildings at sunset

Tuzla, Bosnia & Herzegovina 

The number one cheapest European city may surprise you. Sure, everyone has Madrid on their radar, but have you heard of Tuzla?

The cost of a one-bedroom apartment inside this city center comes to just $225, and you can expect to pay around $5 for a meal in Tuzla.

While many other popular digital nomad hotspots like Bali or Barcelona have become overly popular, this hidden gem remains a secret.

Tuzla has plenty to discover–you’ll find that old-world architecture Europe is loved for alongside charming cafes and salt lakes that are complete with gorgeous beaches.

This Bosnian metropolis is a great place to be if you want to save money and easily travel to the Balkans and eastern Europe.

Aerial view of people swimming

Oradea, Romania

Another culturally diverse and unbelievably affordable European city is Oradea in the northeast of Romania.

This lesser-known Romanian city is home to a wealth of eclectic architecture, with many buildings built in the art nouveau and baroque era styles.

But perhaps the biggest draw of the area is the nearby Apuseni mountains.

Oradea is the perfect base for digital nomads looking for a smaller, liveable city that feels less touristy and has excellent nature access. 

The Apuseni mountains boast a number of breathtaking hikes, and the Crisul Repede River cuts through the city, making this city perfect for relaxing nature walks after long days online.

Oradea’s prices are nearly unbeatable, with an apartment in the city center costing around $220-330 a month.

Union Square Aerial View In Oradea Romania

Craiova, Romania

If Romania wasn’t on your radar of digital nomad friendly countries before, it certainly will be after this list.

Located a convenient 4-hour train ride from Bucharest, Craoiva boasts a low cost of living, incredible parks and greenspaces, and rich cultural institutions.

If you choose to base yourself in Craiova, you can anticipate an apartment costing around $330 a month and a meal out to cost about $6.

Craiova-Romania-stunning-building-with-people-wandering-about

Plovdiv, Bulgaria

Forget overrun destinations like Rome–if you want to have an authentic old-world European experience without the crowds and high prices, look to Plovdiv.

This underrated city is one of the five oldest cities in the world, pre-dating even Athens.

The abundance of cultural wealth and rich historical lineage here will captivate you the entire time you call Plovdiv home.

And unlike more touristy or popular European cities, Plovdiv is extremely livable.

You’ll enjoy cozy cafes and wine bars, a thriving art scene, affordable prices, and incredible historical attractions.

And the best part?

Your rent here will only set you back $345 for a one bedroom apartment inside this colorful cobblestoned city center.

kapana hipster and nightlife district in plovdiv, bulgaria

Iasi, Romania

If you love architecture, history, and culture on a budget, Iasi is the place for you.

This Romanian metropolis is home to an impressive 100 churches and monasteries, and boasts impressive historical lineage.

You’ll discover grand medieval palaces along with one of the oldest and largest botanical gardens in Europe.

Iasi is surrounded by seven hills, providing ample walking and biking to burn off stress and keep fit while working on your computer.

Since Iasi is a university town and hub for young people, the nightlife here is lively and you won't have to search far for a good time.

Cost of living is easily manageable here, with a one bedroom city apartment averaging around $430 a meal out costing less than $8.

Palace-of-Culture-at-Golden-Hour-in-Iasi-Romania

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This article originally appeared on TravelOffPath.com

Opinions expressed here are the author’s alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, hotel, airline, or other entity. This content has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of the entities included within the post.


Travelguy

Monday 4th of March 2024

Not sure why these articles keep getting spammed all the time. Every city these digital nomads invade ends up having costs sky rocket, especially flats because they just come in to the city, see they are charged 800 or 1000 or 1200 euros (or equivalent) for rent and think it's cheap compared to their city even though locals were used to paying 3 or 4 or 500. Just freakin stay in the few cities you've already ruined and let the rest of us enjoy our homes in peace, ffs.