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Vietnam Officially Removes All Entry Requirements

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Vietnam has just removed its Covid testing requirement for all travelers – which means the country now has ZERO Covid-related entry requirements.

With effect from 15 May any visitor that is entering Vietnam is no longer required to take a pre-departure Covid-19 PCR test or Rapid Antigen test prior to their arrival.

Sunset Cruise Vietnam at Dau Go Island in Halong Bay

Therefore, traveling to Vietnam is now like what it was in pre-pandemic times, with travelers only needing to obtain a visa prior to traveling – or alternatively enter visa-free – if they hold a passport which allows them to do so.

What Were The Previous Entry Requirements For Vietnam?

Travel woman choosing lanterns in Hoi An, Vietnam

Two months ago we reported that Vietnam had reopened for tourism purposes once again – with the country in fact going from being one of the strictest countries for international visitors to be able to enter in Southeast Asia, to becoming the easiest.

And, this was due to their simple entry requirements, which included only the following:

Golden bridge at Ba Na Hills in Danang, Vietnam
  • take a Covid-19 RT-PCR or RT-LAMP test no more than three days (72 hours) prior to your departure, OR;
  • take a Covid-19 rapid antigen test no more than one day (24 hours) prior to your departure
Phu Quoc Cable Car

Contrary to many other Asian nations, Vietnam has also not required travelers to declare their vaccination status since reopening, and so all visitors – whether vaccinated or not – have had to adhere to the above entry rules.  

However, with Vietnam having already removed the requirement for travelers to complete the online health declaration form, download the government’s ‘PC-Covid’ app – as well as the need to purchase Covid-19 travel insurance – the nation had in fact only requested recent travelers entering the country to undergo pre-departure testing.

Vietnamese women selling and buying fruits on floating market, Mekong River Delta, Vietnam

From yesterday (May 15, 2022), though, this is no longer required – and so travelers now only need to obtain an eVisa prior to their arrival, unless they are allowed visa-free travel due to them holding a passport from a nation that qualifies for this.

Obtaining A Visa For Entry To Vietnam

Vietnam tourist visa

American and Canadian travelers will need to obtain a tourist eVisa online before traveling to Vietnam – however – this is extremely simple and straightforward, with the online application process taking around 5 minutes to complete.

So, where can you get your tourist eVisa for Vietnam?

It is extremely easy to obtain your tourist eVisa for Vietnam – by applying online here.

Landscape of houses on the mountain on foggy day in early morning at Da Lat, Vietnam

You will need to complete an online form with your passport details, as well as upload an electronic copy of your passport, along with a digital passport-sized photo.

The website states that you should receive the result of your visa application within 3 working days – and you will receive an email with a confirmation of this.

Wonderful view of the East Gate (Hien Nhon Gate), Hue

However – based on my own recent experience when traveling to Vietnam – it took 4 working days to receive confirmation of my eVisa, and so I would recommend applying at least 7 working days before your planned departure to Vietnam.

Once you have submitted your application, you can continually check the status of this by entering your registration details here.

The cost of the eVisa is US$25.

Bui View Street in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Once you receive email confirmation that your eVisa application was successful, you will need to go onto the eVisa website and download a PDF copy of your eVisa.

You will need to print this out and show this in hard copy both at the airport that you are departing from – as well as on arrival at the eVisa counter at your arrival port in Vietnam.

Woman in rice fields in Vietnam

How Long Can You Stay In Vietnam With A Tourist eVisa?

Vietnam’s tourist eVisa will allow you to stay in the country for up to 30 days.

Prior to the Covid-19 pandemic, the nation was offering visitors the opportunity to purchase a visa for up to 90 days – however, as of this moment visitors are only able to apply for a eVisa which allows them to stay 30 days inside Vietnam.

The city of Hanoi, Vietnam

Nationals From 25 Countries Qualify For Visa-Free Travel To Vietnam 

Nationals from 25 countries – including those who hold a British passport – can enter Vietnam for visa-free travel, from anything from 15 to up to 90 days, depending on the person’s nationality.

For example, British travelers are able to arrive into Vietnam without a visa and stay for up to 15 days.

Woman with backpack swims on boat among karst mountains to meet her friends. Tam Coc, North of Vietnam.

My Recent Experience Of Traveling To Vietnam

Having traveled to Vietnam myself last week (12 May) – from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia – I was in fact required to still undergo a pre-departure rapid antigen test 24 hours prior to traveling.

However, this was the only Covid-related entry requirement that I had to adhere to in order to enter the country.

Aerial View Of Hanoi at night, Vietnam

Although upon my arrival into Vietnam, the immigration officer that stamped me into the country did not ask to see my negative Covid test certificate – it was only when I checked into my flight in Malaysia that I was required to show this.

The other documents that I was asked for – when checking into my flight at KLIA2 international airport in Kuala Lumpur – were:

Hand holding a British Passport
  • my passport (obviously!)
  • a copy of my eVisa letter for Vietnam
  • the booking confirmation of my flight ticket out of Vietnam.

So with no more Covid-related entry requirements to worry about, it is once again as simple as that to enter Vietnam!

Are Masks Still Required In Vietnam?

Vietnam During COVID-19

Having been traveling around Vietnam since last week, there seems to me a much more ‘relaxed’ approach when it comes to wearing a mask in public places – especially compared to when I visited both Malaysia and Thailand in the previous few months.

For instance, when I arrived in Ho Chi Minh City – having taken a flight from Malaysia – there was a considerable number of people outdoors not wearing a face mask.

Cyclist riding through the ancient city of Hoi An

I also noticed that a number of passengers on my internal flight from Ho Chi Minh City to Danang, just a few days ago, did also not wear a face covering during the flight – with the airline staff appearing to not request them to do so.

Why Should You Visit Vietnam?

Couple Of Tourists Pictured Gazing At Some Karst Mountains In An Unspecified Location In Vietnam

There are so many reasons why you should visit Vietnam – with the nation offering many awesome destinations for travelers.

Whether you are looking to find out what it is like to travel the country by one of its sleeper trains or visit one of the nation’s ancient cities, such as Hoi An – there really is something for all types of traveler. 

Hoi An ancient town riverfront

And since the end of last year (2021), it has even been possible to fly direct from the U.S. to Vietnam – with flights available from the state of San Francisco to the city of Ho Chi Minh (Saigon), which is located in the south of Vietnam.

Read more:

Travel Insurance That Covers Covid-19 For 2022

The Most Recent Changes In Southeast Asia Travelers Need To Know For May

What It’s Like Entering Thailand Right Now

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Disclaimer: Current travel rules and restrictions can change without notice. The decision to travel is ultimately your responsibility. Contact your consulate and/or local authorities to confirm your nationality’s entry and/or any changes to travel requirements before traveling.  Travel Off Path does not endorse traveling against government advisories


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John

Saturday 18th of June 2022

Some Vietnamese government websites still indicate that travel insurance is required. Of course, they may not have updated their websites. Can anyone provide a current link to a Vietnamese government website that definitively states travel insurance is not required or maybe a traveler's post about a recent (June 18, 2022) entry into Vietnam. Thank you.

Yen Nguyen

Friday 20th of May 2022

Do we still need $10K Covid insurance for entry to Viet Nam? If so, please help to identify the insurance company we can buy this insurance? I have a hard time finding it for me 76 years old traveler and my older friend.

James

Tuesday 17th of May 2022

Philippines Malaysia etc take note. Nobody will bother with testing and vaccine requirements when they can go to Vietnam without any requirements

Rachel

Monday 16th of May 2022

Thank you to Tim for the detailed and honest reporting. Great updates!

P

Monday 16th of May 2022

Excellent news. My favorite place in SEA, but unfortunately they did some wild stuff during the past couple of years that will make me think long and hard about going any time soon. Also, it's hard to get there without hitting some country with testing or vaxxx reqs.

no clot shot thanks

Monday 23rd of May 2022

@P, I have the same feeling, but need to ignore this somehow and think that those sick people are in every country. In some countries they managed to pull their dystopia in to action.

What we can do is to ignore those dystopia hellholes if they still dreaming to continue. Hopefully we are big ignoring force and it hits them hard.

But for now, I def wanna visit hot and free Asia when it gets dark and cold in Europe.